Just finished making a static page which lists and links all of my recordings so far. Since I’ve completed 179, this has taken a while. Still, it’s a good list. And hopefully keeping it current won’t be too complicated, since a fair bit of what I record now, I am also organising behind the ...

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This was a very random idea on Saturday morning, just before a very busy day offline commenced.  “Hey, no-one’s gotten dibs on this week’s podcast.  What could I do … hmm … ah, I know: something with crazy sci-fi sound effects.”  By that evening, I had some support for it … by Sunday morning ...

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Sometimes, things just get a bit out of hand.  When a little sci-fi story by Fritz Leiber wasn’t renewed as per US copyright requirements, who knew that 49 years later, people around the world would leap upon it to record for audio posterity. My version is first into the catalogue, thanks to the editing of Mandarine.  ...

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So, my second ever podcast is out, making the LibriVox community chortle: http://www.archive.org/download/librivox_community/ librivox_community_podcast_59_64kb.mp3 (16.2MB, 33:41) Probably not so exciting to non-LV listeners, since this one is celebrating approaching 1000 titles in the Librivox catalogue. When I got dibs on the date for this podcast, a few weeks ago, I thought we’d easily hit ...

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South! The Story of Shackleton’s Last Expedition 1914-1917 I finished my chapter of South! just moments before the LibriVox deadline — and what a great chapter it is!  I have not however, found out why the Antarctic explorers’ place of refuge had been named Elephant Island. I probably just need to listen to the rest of the ...

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Ah, lovely Gertrude Stein! From Bartleby.com: By departing from conventional meaning, grammar and syntax, she attempted to capture “moments of consciousness,” independent of time and memory. Or to put it another way, in Stein’s own words: A steady cake, any steady cake is perfect and not plain, any steady cake has a mounting reason ...

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My reading of the short story A Hunger Artist by Franz Kafka, translated by Ian Johnston, has just been catalogued.  Hunger artists are, of course, people who starve publically — in a performance sense, not a documentary-on-countries-with-famine sense.  Linking getting thinner with getting the public’s attention has media-anorexia overtones, though masochism and traditional views ...

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